Digging Beirut

1 10 2009

This is a fun city. Its also an old city. Thousand year old rivalries and conflicts are as strong today as they were ages ago.
This was put to us today when taking a little detour off the tourist track to Bourj Hammoud, a heavily populated district in northeastern Beirut where a big Armenian population resides. We were recommended by our hotel to head there to find second hand camera equipment.
We also met a very helpful young man in a coffee shop. He is Turkish, wants to go to England to participate in some hooliganism and has a Hitler speech as the ringtone on his phone. He also talked about the Armenians and how they were just greedy and wanted to take all the Turks land.
I understand that this young man was not the best representation of the Turkish population in Beirut but I think it gave me a reminder about how people can cling onto something that happened 90 years ago.
Sorry about the sophomoric philisophical musings.
Anyhoo, whilst there I took some snaps at some of the religious iconography in the area.

Jesus on a street corner in Bourj Hammoud

Jesus on a street corner in Bourj Hammoud


Jesus graffitti in Bourj Hammoud

Jesus graffitti in Bourj Hammoud


After, We went to the Rawcheh Rock formation which is the most famous natural feature of Beirut. Went to a cafe near there and took this photo of a nargileh or hookah attendant preparing it for a customer.
Preparing the hookah at sunset

Preparing the hookah at sunset

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In Lebanon

28 09 2009

After a four hour wait at the Syrian-Lebanese border, we are now in Tripoli in transit to Beirut which is our final destination before heading back to Cambodia.
These photos were taken at the border where after being bored for the first two hours, a young Lebanese girl decided that I was the focus of all her attention and played with me for a good hour thereafter before her parents decided that I was getting a bit tired from all the attention.

my lebanese play buddy at the border

my lebanese play buddy at the border